4

Why is a day measured from evening to morning in Genesis 1?



      

Genesis 1:1 - 31

ESV - 1 In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth. 2 The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters.

Clarify Share Report Asked July 01 2013 Mini Anonymous (via GotQuestions)

Community answers are sorted based on votes. The higher the vote, the further up an answer is.

13
Shea S. Michael Houdmann Supporter Got Questions Ministries
The most natural explanation for a day being measured from evening to morning in Genesis 1 is that the beginning of time was marked by darkness. Genesis 1:2 notes, "The earth was without form and v...

July 01 2013 2 responses Vote Up Share Report


0
Data Pastor Shafer
Bara' -- Create Defined 
"Created" in Gen. 1:1 is from the Hebrew bara' (HSN-), to bring into being (see Heb. 11:3). It is used 7 times in the first two chapters of Genesis (Gen. 1:1,21,27; 2:3,4). In all other places "made" and "make" are used, proving the six days' work to be mainly reconstructive. In Gen. 1:1 the universe is brought into existence; in Gen. 1:21 sea creatures are created; and in Gen. 1:27 man is created. Thus, bara' (HSN-) is reserved for the introduction of the three great spheres of existence: the world of matter; the natural life of all living creatures; and spiritual life represented by man. 
God's original creations include the heavens, the earth, and all things therein as first brought into being -- made perfect the first time. Gen. 1:1 refers to the beginning of the creative ages (Job 38; Ps. 8:3-8; 19:1-6; Prov. 8:22-31; Jn. 1:3,10; Acts 1 4-26; Col. 1:15-18; Heb. 1:1-12; 11:3; Rev. 4:11). The six days of re-creation (Gen. 1:3 -- Gen. 2:25) end the creative ages, and are distinct from the original creations of the heavens and earth. 

Verse 3
a [God said] "God said," ten times: at the beginning of each day; third day twice; sixth day four times (Gen. 1:3,6,9,11,14,20,24,26,28,29).


"Let" is used 14 times in this chapter, 1,497 times elsewhere, and in no case is an original creative act implied. The sense is "made appear" or "made visible," expressing permission and purpose in connection with already existing things. The light, firmament, waters, earth, darkness and all other things mentioned here were already in existence but had been thrown into chaos, and the laws which previously governed them had been made void. The purpose of their existence had been annulled because of sin. 
Now, in the restoration to perfection, God merely commands and the sun gives light again, as it did all through Lucifer's kingdom (Jer. 4:23-26; 2Pet. 3:5-7). Thus, the light of days one, two, and three came from the sun as has been the case every day since. Compare the use of "let" in Gen. 13:8; 18:4; 24:14-18; Mt. 7:4; 13:30; 27:22; Jn. 14:1; and Php. 2:5 for the true sense.

July 07 2017 0 responses Vote Up Share Report


Add your Answer

All answers are REVIEWED and MODERATED.
Please ensure your answer MEETS all our guidelines.

What makes a good answer? ▼

A good answer provides new insight and perspective. Here are guidelines to help facilitate a meaningful learning experience for everyone.

  1. Adhere to the eBible Statement of Faith.
  2. Your answer should be complete and stand-alone.
  3. Include supporting arguments, and scripture references if possible. Seek to answer the "why".
  4. Adhere to a proper tone and spirit of love and understanding.
  5. For more info see The Complete Guide to eBible
Header
  1. 4000 characters remaining