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Will there be a second chance for salvation after the Rapture?

[This question assumes the pre-trib rapture in it's premise. For related topics, see:

https://ebible.com/questions/3953-is-the-word-rapture-in-the-bible
https://ebible.com/questions/634-what-is-the-rapture-of-the-church
https://ebible.com/questions/3495-will-there-be-a-second-chance-for-salvation-after-death]

Clarify Share Report Asked July 01 2013 Mini Anonymous (via GotQuestions)

For follow-up discussion and general commentary on the topic. Comments are sorted chronologically.

Mini Martin County

The word 'Rapture' means joy. It is joyful to visit the zoo, watch your children play, or a comic perform. When Christian Saints meet our Lord in the air, it will be called, Risen! I will be thankful, I will praise The Lord for my salvation, and I will be humble. Eve Cassady

April 14 2014 Report

Dsc 0043 Tim Collinson

actually the word rapio in Latin means to snatch, seize root out (as in pulling out weeds) we get the word rapture from this.. the word harpazo in the Koine Greek
means exactly or similarly the same thing.

April 26 2014 Report

Closeup Jennifer Rothnie

In english, rapture means ecstasy, joy, rhapsody, etc; or references the theory of a secret rapture by Christ.

In Latin:
"Rapture" derives from the first person plural passive of the latin "rapio/rapere" (drag off, snatch, seize, carry off) which is "Rapiemur" in the Latin Vulgate translation. [The english word 'rape' also derives from rapio/rapere, so you can see how even rapiemur is not equivalent to 'rapture']. This latin word rapiemur is used in the Latin Vulgate translation in I Thess 4:17, and is itself translated from the greek "arpagēsometha".

In modern Italian (Vanessa contributed this in another thread):
"The modern Italian for this Latin word is "rapimento , rapito , rapire". This word, as well as meaning all of the above, is often used to describe the total absorbtion of mind and spirit".

In Greek:
"Arpagēsometha" is the second future passive indicative of "harpazo", which means to sieze/carry away/obtain by robbery. Imagine a king force-ably taking his spoils of war. This "seizing" does not imply a specific set of locations, nor does the word define who is doing the seizing, why, or to whom. The context and surrounding words/details must be relied on for that, so it varies by verse. (II Cor 12:12, Matt 12:29, Acts 8:39, Rev 12:5, John 10:28, Acts 23:10). Harpazo refers to an open display of force.

Also see:

https://ebible.com/questions/4342-where-does-the-term-rapture-originate-from
https://ebible.com/questions/3953-is-the-word-rapture-in-the-bible

October 31 2014 Report

Mini John Warren

Why wait until that last moment for salvation? Why take chances with your eternal soul and life? Accept Christ as your Lord and Savior now! Today! Enjoy the knowledge and comfort and joy of having the Savior in your life, walking by your side, sharing your joys and sorrows, and helping you along the way. Acceptance of salvation in Jesus is something to be savored and shared. Easter is upon us, do it today!

March 24 2016 Report

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